Statisfaction

another nice one from Elsevier

Posted in General by nicolaschopin on 23 December 2013

In case you have missed the new round of misdeeds by Elsevier, here is an excellent summary (plus a good overview of the current debate on open access an so on):

http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/the-switch/wp/2013/12/19/how-one-publisher-is-stopping-academics-from-sharing-their-research/?0

Many reactions seem to focus on Academia.edu, which is private company, so perhaps that case is no so black and white. However, I found the story (also mentioned by the WP paper) of our colleague Daniel Povey much more infuriating: Daniel put a legit copy of one of his paper on his web site, some robot wrongly detected this copy as the version owned by Elsevier, sent a DCMA take down note to Google, and boom, Google automatically shut downs Daniel’s google web page entirely. Welcome to the brave new world of robots enacting the Law.

I was talking with an Economist the other day. He told me that big corporations very rarely innovate, because they invested so much in a particular, currently lucrative, business model, even that model is doomed in the medium term. He gave me the example of Kodak: they developed the first digital camera before anyone else, yet they never managed to turn around their business model to make the transition to digital photography. They filed for bankruptcy last year.  I think the same applies to Elsevier: even if it does not even make sense for them in the long run, this company is going to fight ugly to defend its current business model (the “treasure chest behind a pay wall”, the treasure being our papers) rather that trying to transition to a new business model compatible with open access. So I guess it falls on us to consider sending our paper to new players in academic publishing.

In other news, I have heard many French Universities are going to lose any access to Elsevier journals as of 1st Jan 2014, because of failed negociations between Elsevier and these Universities, but I found little detail on the interweb on this particular story.

 

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