Statisfaction

Update on inference with Wasserstein distances

Posted in Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 15 August 2017
levydriven_lambda_summar

You have to read the arXiv report to understand this figure. There’s no way around it.

Hi again,

As described in an earlier postEspen BerntonMathieu Gerber and Christian P. Robert and I are exploring Wasserstein distances for parameter inference in generative models. Generally, ABC and indirect inference are fun to play with, as they make the user think about useful distances between data sets (i.i.d. or not), which is sort of implicit in classical likelihood-based approaches. Thinking about distances between data sets can be a helpful and healthy exercise, even if not always necessary for inference. Viewing data sets as empirical distributions leads to considering the Wasserstein distance, and we try to demonstrate in the paper that it leads to an appealing inferential toolbox.

In passing, the first author Espen Bernton will be visiting Marco Cuturi,  Christian Robert, Nicolas Chopin and others in Paris from September to January; get in touch with him if you’re over there!

We have just updated the arXiv version of the paper, and the main modifications are as follows.

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Statistical inference with the Wasserstein distance

Posted in Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 27 January 2017
NGS Picture ID:1440112

Nature transporting piles of sand.

Hi! It’s been too long!

In a recent arXiv entryEspen Bernton, Mathieu Gerber and Christian P. Robert and I explore the use of the Wasserstein distance to perform parameter inference in generative models. A by-product is an ABC-type approach that bypasses the choice of summary statistics. Instead, one chooses a metric on the observation space. Our work fits in the minimum distance estimation framework and is particularly related to “On minimum Kantorovich distance estimators”, by Bassetti, Bodini and Regazzini. A recent and very related paper is “Wasserstein training of restricted Boltzmann machines“, by Montavon, Müller and Cuturi, who have similar objectives but are not considering purely generative models. Similarly to that paper, we make heavy use of recent breakthroughs in numerical methods to approximate Wasserstein distances, breakthroughs which were not available to Bassetti, Bodini and Regazzini in 2006.

Here I’ll describe the main ideas in a simple setting.  If you’re excited about ABCasymptotic properties of minimum Wasserstein estimators, Hilbert space-filling curves, delay reconstructions and Takens’ theorem, or SMC samplers with r-hit kernels, check our paper!

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Couplings of Normal variables

Posted in R, Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 24 August 2018

2018-gganimate-coupling

Hi,

Just to play a bit with the gganimate package, and to celebrate National Coupling Day, the above plot shows different couplings of two univariate Normal distributions, Normal(0,1) and Normal(2,1). That is, each point is a pair (x,y) where x follows a Normal(0,1) and y follows a Normal(2,1). Below I’ll recall briefly how each coupling operates, in the Normal case. The code is available at the end of the post.

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Sub-Gaussian property for the Beta distribution (part 3, final)

Posted in General, R by Julyan Arbel on 26 December 2017
beta_to_bernoulli

When a Beta random variable wants to act like a Bernoulli: convergence of optimal proxy variance.

In this third and last post about the Sub-Gaussian property for the Beta distribution [1] (post 1 and post 2), I would like to show the interplay with the Bernoulli distribution as well as some connexions with optimal transport (OT is a hot topic in general, and also on this blog with Pierre’s posts on Wasserstein ABC). (more…)

Likelihood calculation for the g-and-k distribution

Posted in R, Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 11 June 2017

 

gandkhistogram

Histogram of 1e5 samples from the g-and-k distribution, and overlaid probability density function

 

Hello,

An example often used in the ABC literature is the g-and-k distribution (e.g. reference [1] below), which is defined through the inverse of its cumulative distribution function (cdf). It is easy to simulate from such distributions by drawing uniform variables and applying the inverse cdf to them. However, since there is no closed-form formula for the probability density function (pdf) of the g-and-k distribution, the likelihood is often considered intractable. It has been noted in [2] that one can still numerically compute the pdf, by 1) numerically inverting the quantile function to get the cdf, and 2)  numerically differentiating the cdf, using finite differences, for instance. As it happens, this is very easy to implement, and I coded up an R tutorial at:

github.com/pierrejacob/winference/blob/master/inst/tutorials/tutorial_gandk.pdf

for anyone interested. This is part of the winference package that goes with our tech report on ABC with the Wasserstein distance  (joint work with Espen Bernton, Mathieu Gerber and Christian Robert, to be updated very soon!). This enables standard MCMC algorithms for the g-and-k example. It is also very easy to compute the likelihood for the multivariate extension of [3], since it only involves a fixed number of one-dimensional numerical inversions and differentiations (as opposed to a multivariate inversion).

Surprisingly, most of the papers that present the g-and-k example do not compare their ABC approximations to the posterior; instead, they typically compare the proposed ABC approach to existing ones. Similarly, the so-called Ricker model is commonly used in the ABC literature, and its posterior can be tackled efficiently using particle MCMC methods; as well as the M/G/1 model, which can be tackled either with particle MCMC methods or with tailor-made MCMC approaches such as [4].

These examples can still have great pedagogical value in ABC papers, but it would perhaps be nice to see more comparisons to the ground truth when it’s available; ground truth here being the actual posterior distribution.

  1. Fearnhead, P. and Prangle, D. (2012) Constructing summary statistics for approximate Bayesian computation: semi-automatic approximate Bayesian computation. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B, 74, 419–474.
  2. Rayner, G. D. and MacGillivray, H. L. (2002) Numerical maximum likelihood estimation for the g-and-k and generalized g-and-h distributions. Statistics and Computing, 12, 57–75.
  3. Drovandi, C. C. and Pettitt, A. N. (2011) Likelihood-free Bayesian estimation of multivari- ate quantile distributions. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, 55, 2541–2556.
  4. Shestopaloff, A. Y. and Neal, R. M. (2014) On Bayesian inference for the M/G/1 queue with efficient MCMC sampling. arXiv preprint arXiv:1401.5548.

ABC in Banff

Posted in General, Seminar/Conference, Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 6 March 2017
c3dhrorvcaaloll

Banff, also known as not the worst location for a scientific meeting.

Hi all,

Last week I attended a wonderful meeting on Approximate Bayesian Computation in Banff, which gathered a nice crowd of ABC users and enthusiasts, including lots of people outside of computational stats, whom I wouldn’t have met otherwise. Christian blogged about it there. My talk on Inference with Wasserstein distances is available as a video here (joint work with Espen Bernton, Mathieu Gerber and Christian Robert, the paper is here). In this post, I’ll summarize a few (personal) points and questions on ABC methods, after recalling the basics of ABC (ahem).

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