Statisfaction

Particle methods in Statistics

Posted in General, Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 30 June 2017
Welding it together

A statistician sampling from a posterior distribution with particle methods

Hi there,

In this post, just in time for the summer, I propose a reading list for people interested in discovering the fascinating world of particle methods, aka sequential Monte Carlo methods, and their use in statistics. I also take the opportunity to advertise the SMC workshop in Uppsala (30 Aug – 1 Sept), which features an amazing list of speakers, including my postdoctoral collaborator Jeremy Heng:

www.it.uu.se/conferences/smc2017

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Likelihood calculation for the g-and-k distribution

Posted in R, Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 11 June 2017

 

gandkhistogram

Histogram of 1e5 samples from the g-and-k distribution, and overlaid probability density function

 

Hello,

An example often used in the ABC literature is the g-and-k distribution (e.g. reference [1] below), which is defined through the inverse of its cumulative distribution function (cdf). It is easy to simulate from such distributions by drawing uniform variables and applying the inverse cdf to them. However, since there is no closed-form formula for the probability density function (pdf) of the g-and-k distribution, the likelihood is often considered intractable. It has been noted in [2] that one can still numerically compute the pdf, by 1) numerically inverting the quantile function to get the cdf, and 2)  numerically differentiating the cdf, using finite differences, for instance. As it happens, this is very easy to implement, and I coded up an R tutorial at:

github.com/pierrejacob/winference/blob/master/inst/tutorials/tutorial_gandk.pdf

for anyone interested. This is part of the winference package that goes with our tech report on ABC with the Wasserstein distance  (joint work with Espen Bernton, Mathieu Gerber and Christian Robert, to be updated very soon!). This enables standard MCMC algorithms for the g-and-k example. It is also very easy to compute the likelihood for the multivariate extension of [3], since it only involves a fixed number of one-dimensional numerical inversions and differentiations (as opposed to a multivariate inversion).

Surprisingly, most of the papers that present the g-and-k example do not compare their ABC approximations to the posterior; instead, they typically compare the proposed ABC approach to existing ones. Similarly, the so-called Ricker model is commonly used in the ABC literature, and its posterior can be tackled efficiently using particle MCMC methods; as well as the M/G/1 model, which can be tackled either with particle MCMC methods or with tailor-made MCMC approaches such as [4].

These examples can still have great pedagogical value in ABC papers, but it would perhaps be nice to see more comparisons to the ground truth when it’s available; ground truth here being the actual posterior distribution.

  1. Fearnhead, P. and Prangle, D. (2012) Constructing summary statistics for approximate Bayesian computation: semi-automatic approximate Bayesian computation. Journal of the Royal Statistical Society: Series B, 74, 419–474.
  2. Rayner, G. D. and MacGillivray, H. L. (2002) Numerical maximum likelihood estimation for the g-and-k and generalized g-and-h distributions. Statistics and Computing, 12, 57–75.
  3. Drovandi, C. C. and Pettitt, A. N. (2011) Likelihood-free Bayesian estimation of multivari- ate quantile distributions. Computational Statistics & Data Analysis, 55, 2541–2556.
  4. Shestopaloff, A. Y. and Neal, R. M. (2014) On Bayesian inference for the M/G/1 queue with efficient MCMC sampling. arXiv preprint arXiv:1401.5548.

ABC in Banff

Posted in General, Seminar/Conference, Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 6 March 2017
c3dhrorvcaaloll

Banff, also known as not the worst location for a scientific meeting.

Hi all,

Last week I attended a wonderful meeting on Approximate Bayesian Computation in Banff, which gathered a nice crowd of ABC users and enthusiasts, including lots of people outside of computational stats, whom I wouldn’t have met otherwise. Christian blogged about it there. My talk on Inference with Wasserstein distances is available as a video here (joint work with Espen Bernton, Mathieu Gerber and Christian Robert, the paper is here). In this post, I’ll summarize a few (personal) points and questions on ABC methods, after recalling the basics of ABC (ahem).

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Statistical inference with the Wasserstein distance

Posted in Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 27 January 2017
NGS Picture ID:1440112

Nature transporting piles of sand.

Hi! It’s been too long!

In a recent arXiv entryEspen Bernton, Mathieu Gerber and Christian P. Robert and I explore the use of the Wasserstein distance to perform parameter inference in generative models. A by-product is an ABC-type approach that bypasses the choice of summary statistics. Instead, one chooses a metric on the observation space. Our work fits in the minimum distance estimation framework and is particularly related to “On minimum Kantorovich distance estimators”, by Bassetti, Bodini and Regazzini. A recent and very related paper is “Wasserstein training of restricted Boltzmann machines“, by Montavon, Müller and Cuturi, who have similar objectives but are not considering purely generative models. Similarly to that paper, we make heavy use of recent breakthroughs in numerical methods to approximate Wasserstein distances, breakthroughs which were not available to Bassetti, Bodini and Regazzini in 2006.

Here I’ll describe the main ideas in a simple setting.  If you’re excited about ABCasymptotic properties of minimum Wasserstein estimators, Hilbert space-filling curves, delay reconstructions and Takens’ theorem, or SMC samplers with r-hit kernels, check our paper!

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Coupling of particle filters: smoothing

Posted in Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 20 July 2016

 

withAS

Two trajectories made for each other.

 

Hi again!

In this post, I’ll explain the new smoother introduced in our paper Coupling of Particle Filters with Fredrik Lindsten and Thomas B. Schön from Uppsala University. Smoothing refers to the task of estimating a latent process x_{0:T} = (x_0,\ldots, x_T) of length T, given noisy measurements of it, y_{1:T} = (y_0,\ldots, y_T); the smoothing distribution refers to p(dx_{0:T}|y_{1:T}). The setting is state-space models (what else?!), with a fixed parameter assumed to have been previously estimated.

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Coupling of particle filters: likelihood curves

Posted in Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 19 July 2016

Hi!

In this post, I’ll write about coupling particle filters, as proposed in our recent paper with Fredrik Lindsten and Thomas B. Schön from Uppsala University, available on arXiv; and also in this paper by colleagues at NUS. The paper is about a methodology with multiple direct consequences. In this first post, I’ll focus on correlated likelihood estimators; in a later post, I’ll describe a new smoothing algorithm. Both are described in detail in the article. We’ve been blessed to have been advertised by xi’an’s og, so glory is just around the corner.

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Back to blogging

Posted in General by Pierre Jacob on 9 July 2016
edwaert_collier_-_vanitas_-_still_life_with_books_and_manuscripts_and_a_skull_-_google_art_project

My new desk.

My last post dates back to May 2015… thanks to JB and Julyan for keeping the place busy! I’m not (quite) dead and intend to go back to posting stuff every now and then. And by the way, congrats to both for their new jobs!

Last July, I’ve also started a new job,  as an assistant professor in the Department of Statistics at Harvard University, after having spent two years in Oxford. At some point, I might post something on the cultural difference between the European English and American communities of statisticians.

In the coming weeks, I’ll tell you all about a new paper entitled Coupling of Particle Filters,  co-written with Fredrik Lindsten and Thomas B. Schön from Uppsala University in Sweden. We are excited about this coupling idea because it’s simple and yet brings massive gains in many important aspects of inference for state space models (including both parameter inference and smoothing). I’ll be talking about it at the World Congress in Probability and Statistics in Toronto next week and at JSM in Chicago, early in August.

I’ll also try to write about another exciting project, joint work with Christian Robert, Chris Holmes and Lawrence Murray, on modularization, cutting feedback, the infamous cut function of BUGS and all that funny stuff. I’ve talked about it in ISBA 2016, and intend to put the associated tech report on arXiv over the summer.

Stay tuned!

Sequential Bayesian inference for time series

Posted in Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 19 May 2015
Bayes factor between two hidden Markov models

Bayes factor between two hidden Markov models, against number of assimilated observations. Values near zero support the simpler model while values larger than one support the more complex model.

Hello hello,

I have just arXived a review article, written for ESAIM: Proceedings and Surveys, called Sequential Bayesian inference for implicit hidden Markov models and current limitations. The topic is sequential Bayesian estimation: you want to perform inference (say, parameter inference, or prediction of future observations), taking into account parameter and model uncertainties, using hidden Markov models. I hope that the article can be useful for some people: I have tried to stay at a general level, but there are more than 90 references if you’re interested in learning more (sorry in advance for not having cited your article on the topic!).  Below I’ll comment on a few points.

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[Meta-]Blogging as young researchers

Posted in General, Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 11 December 2014

Summary of the article.

Hello all,

This is an article intended for the ISBA bulletin, jointly written by us all at Statisfaction, Rasmus Bååth from Publishable Stuff, Boris Hejblum from Research side effects, Thiago G. Martins from tgmstat@wordpress, Ewan Cameron from Another Astrostatistics Blog and Gregory Gandenberger from gandenberger.org

Inspired by established blogs, such as the popular Statistical Modeling, Causal Inference, and Social Science or Xi’an’s Og, each of us began blogging as a way to diarize our learning adventures, to share bits of R code or LaTeX tips, and to advertise our own papers and projects. Along the way we’ve come to a new appreciation of the world of academic blogging: a never-ending international seminar, attended by renowned scientists and anonymous users alike. Here we share our experiences by weighing the pros and cons of blogging from the point of view of young researchers.

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Non-negative unbiased estimators

Posted in Statistics by Pierre Jacob on 13 May 2014
Benedict Cumberbatch having to choose between unbiasedness and non-negativity.

Benedict has to choose between unbiasedness and non-negativity.

Hey hey,

With Alexandre Thiéry we’ve been working on non-negative unbiased estimators for a while now. Since I’ve been talking about it at conferences and since we’ve just arXived the second version of the article, it’s time for a blog post. This post is kind of a follow-up of a previous post from July, where I was commenting on Playing Russian Roulette with Intractable Likelihoods by Mark Girolami, Anne-Marie Lyne, Heiko Strathmann, Daniel Simpson, Yves Atchade.

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